The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects

Daniel Cottle

Abstract


Covid‑19 restrictions affected most of the post‑16 learning experience of the students who will begin university courses in STEM in the UK in autumn 2021. Ongoing disruption to learning culminated in the cancellation of normal A-level examinations which were replaced with teacher assessments. Informal discussion with secondary school teaching colleagues reveals some possible consequences for the students’ transition to degree level study in STEM subjects. The main suggestion is that, despite the resilience that students have shown both academically and socially, there have been significant omissions from the normally studied curriculum that may affect their progress on degree courses in STEM including: lack of experimental practice and skills, lack of specific subject knowledge and lack of experience of assessment.


Keywords


Transition; covid-19

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i16.3847

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New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences

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